Business community prepares next generation: TWU launches business mentor program

“I’ve learned life lessons that have been costly—if I can invest in Grenier, helping him to avoid some of the pitfalls of business—it will take him only a few years to learn what has taken some a decade” Ben Gauer, Royal LePage owner.


Langley, B.C.—Local business student J.P. Grenier is in his third year at Trinity Western University, but he doesn’t have to wait to graduate to learn what it takes to make it in the corporate world. Grenier is one of the students who is taking part in the new School of Business mentorship program at TWU. The program gives students a long-term opportunity to be mentored by a business professional in their field of interest.

“Having a mentor means having all the experience that he has accumulated at my disposal. I can learn from his mistakes and his successes, without having to make those same mistakes myself. It means learning about the real business world through someone I can trust,” says Grenier.

“I’ve learned life lessons that have been costly—if I can invest in Grenier, helping him to avoid some of the pitfalls of business—it will take him only a few years to learn what has taken some a decade” says Ben Gauer, Royal LePage owner and mentor to Grenier.

Rod Ross, who leads the School of Business mentorship program, sees the benefit going both ways. “I’m excited by the enthusiastic response we’ve had from the business community. It’s a great opportunity for students and a chance for business people to scout for talent, while giving back.”

The purpose of the mentor program is to allow students to build relationships with business professionals who are working in the students’ field of interest. In the process, students pick up helpful business tips along the way.

“Students have an opportunity to glean wisdom that they cannot gain from their textbooks alone,” adds Ross. “The business program’s use of solid academic teaching and faculty expertise in business practice ensures that graduates will have the tools needed to face the business world—being mentored is an extension of that training.”

This November, the School of Business hosted their first breakfast for professionals who have undertaken the task of mentoring students. The breakfast was an opportunity for business students to connect personally with their mentors. And the mentors in the program are from diverse industries—inventors, developers and entrepreneurs—allowing students an opportunity to connect with a mentor in their area of interest.

Gauer is enthused to be a part of the program and would not hesitate to sign up again.

“I am thrilled to be able to share some of the wisdom I have learned; it is especially rewarding to invest in someone who not only takes your advice but acts on it—you see the difference it makes in their life—and it is always more fulfilling to be able to give than receive.”

Students like Grenier believe that the benefits of the program are self evident. “My expectations have already been surpassed. I am amazed at the level of personal interest my mentor now has in my life and wellbeing. He has become more than just a business mentor; he wants to see me succeed in every aspect of my life. How many people do you know who are willing to invest in you like that?”

Trinity Western University, located in Langley, B.C., is a not-for-profit Christian liberal arts university enrolling over 3,200 students this year. With a broad based, liberal arts and sciences curriculum, the University offers undergraduate degrees in 38 major areas of study ranging from business, education and computer science to biology and nursing, and 12 other graduate degrees including counseling psychology, theology and administrative leadership.

Last Updated: 2015-07-13
Author: Keela Keeping